105645
17 Apr 14 at 1 am

Inside Llewyn Davis (2013)

(Source: the-3rd-act, via poipletoitle)

"I’m tired… I’m so tired. I thought I just needed a night’s sleep, but it’s more than that."

 38561
17 Apr 14 at 1 am

megustamarcus:

jazzaroune:

baesos:

leatherlaceleopard:

bonestructure:

appreciation post

Raven Simone & her GF

Yassss

YESS RAE YESSS

OMFG YES!!!!~

(via theclassicvillain)

megustamarcus:

jazzaroune:

baesos:

leatherlaceleopard:

bonestructure:

appreciation post

Raven Simone & her GF

Yassss

YESS RAE YESSS

OMFG YES!!!!~
 374024
17 Apr 14 at 1 am

theequeenoffuckingeverything:

Literally the best bromance to ever bromance

(Source: darkchocolateandtea, via dudeitsdon)

 70246
17 Apr 14 at 1 am

f0rever-ydg:

kilicanfilimeanyday:

youngjusticer:

"Let it burn."

Queen of the Flame, by Rika Chan.

Only version of this I’ve liked

theres a let it burn cover on youtube!

(via 20181147)

f0rever-ydg:

kilicanfilimeanyday:

youngjusticer:

"Let it burn."
Queen of the Flame, by Rika Chan.

Only version of this I’ve liked

theres a let it burn cover on youtube!
 109415
17 Apr 14 at 1 am

oliviaterhorststeele:

yrdeadbeatfriend:

sixpenceee:

canoeing in a crystal clear lake 

coolest but scariest fucking thing

baller

(Source: sixpenceee, via 20181147)

oliviaterhorststeele:

yrdeadbeatfriend:

sixpenceee:

canoeing in a crystal clear lake 

coolest but scariest fucking thing

baller
 69226
17 Apr 14 at 1 am

infinitelysaved:

notspeakingisnt-notlistening:

annalisah:

COUNTER // CULTURE

For my photography class I did series of self-portraits in which I attempted to portray culture and counterculture for the past 10 decades. This is the product of that idea…

this is SO COOL oh man

I love this

(via teiberry)

made-for-mayhem:

oh shit
 77712
16 Apr 14 at 11 pm

humansofnewyork:

“When my husband was dying, I said: ‘Moe, how am I supposed to live without you?’ He told me: ‘Take the love you have for me and spread it around.’”

(via 1s4ac)

humansofnewyork:

“When my husband was dying, I said: ‘Moe, how am I supposed to live without you?’ He told me: ‘Take the love you have for me and spread it around.’”
 350
16 Apr 14 at 11 pm

thegayteen:

moralesja:

Milky Way in the desert night sky.

You’re able to see the Milky Way with the naked eye in areas without light pollution.

Not the greatest photo, but in order to capture it without the stars moving a high iso was required. It was tough trying to remove the noise without taking out details.

pictures like this really explain how ancient societies looked up to the heavens with such wonder and why they wanted to honor the gods

(via 1s4ac)

thegayteen:

moralesja:

Milky Way in the desert night sky.
You’re able to see the Milky Way with the naked eye in areas without light pollution.
Not the greatest photo, but in order to capture it without the stars moving a high iso was required. It was tough trying to remove the noise without taking out details.

pictures like this really explain how ancient societies looked up to the heavens with such wonder and why they wanted to honor the gods
 8209
16 Apr 14 at 11 pm

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via 1s4ac)

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

"Stop beating yourself up. You are a work in progress - which means you get there a little at a time, not all at once."